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New California Laws for 2020

New California Laws for 2020

T
he start of the new year brings a lot of changes for everyone. For many people, the new year is the perfect time to for self-improvement through New Year’s Resolutions. However, this isn’t the change that we are talking about.

Every year, lawmakers discuss and debate new laws. When they agree on a law, it is assigned a date when the law will go into effect. Typically, this date is January 1st of the following year. This is why the new year always brings new laws with it.

Due to the fact that new laws appear each year, it is very important for people to pay attention to the changes or else they could find themselves in trouble for doing something that is no longer legal.

Some New California Laws for 2020

Each year in California, law makers vote on dozens of laws to decide whether or not they should be enacted. Due to the sheer volume of laws being considered, even if a lot of laws are rejected, there are still plenty that get added each year. Here is just a sample of some of the laws going into effect on January 1st, 2020

  • Assembly Bill (AB) 5 – Forces companies to reevaluate all contract workers and consider them employees, with full benefits, unless they can prove that the worker is a contractor based on certain requirements.
  • AB 9 – Extends the time period in which employees can make claims of discrimination and harassments against companies from 1 year to 3 years.
  • AB 12 – Makes it so law enforcement officers can request firearm restraining orders against an individual. Also makes it so that courts can adjust the length of the restraining order’s time period to be anywhere from 1 to 5 years in length.
  • AB 25 (California Consumer Privacy Act) – Requires businesses that collect digital information about consumers to alert consumers to what information is being collected, allow the consumer to deny the collection and selling of that information, and to allow the consumer to request a company to delete any information it may have collected on the consumer. Also allows consumers whose information got stolen to sue the company that allowed the theft to occur.
  • AB 178 – Requires all new homes being built in California after January 1st, 2020 to have solar panels installed on them.
  • AB218 – Expands what counts as childhood sexual abuse, reclassifies childhood sexual abuse as childhood sexual assault, and extends the statute of limitations for reporting such incidents from 8 years to 22 years.
  • AB 272– Makes it so that governing bodies of schools can decided if and when students can use cell phones while at school and in classes. Also sets specific circumstances when a school cannot prevent a student from using a cell phone.
  • AB 317 – Makes it an infraction for a person to sell their appointment with the DMV to someone else.
  • AB 377 – Modifies different aspects of microenterprise home kitchens. Notably, prohibits microenterprise home kitchens from producing and selling any and all dairy products, modifies how these operations are inspected, and prohibits microenterprise home kitchens from using the word catering in any advertisements.
  • AB 391 – Reduces the amount of time a company has to wait to report a rental or leased vehicle as stolen after a failure to return from 5 days to 72 hours.
  • AB 392 – Redefines when it is acceptable for a police officer to use deadly force.

New Laws for the New Year

This is just a small sample of all of the laws that were voted for over the last year. Some of them affect the general populace more than others. Regardless, it is always important for a person to stay up to date on all the new laws coming into effect at the start of each year. Failing to do so is a great way for a person wind up in unexpected trouble.

What do you think of some of these new laws for 2020? Do some take things too far? Are others long overdue? Are there any new laws that you know about that you feel should have been on this list? If so, share them in the comments below and help other people stay in the know.

How to Stay Safe with Ride Share Services

How to Stay Safe with Ride Share Services

How to Stay Safe with Ride Share Services

O
ne of the many great services to come out of the digital age is ride sharing. Apps like Uber and Lyft have made getting a ride to or from just about anywhere incredibly convenient. All a person has to do is pull up the app on their phone and a driver will soon be on their way.

Unfortunately, as great as this new tech is, there are still some problems. As with anything good, there are people out there who want to take advantage of it. Some people are just bad at driving people around, while others are purposefully looking for ways to take advantage of people. When hiring a ride through these services, a person needs to be careful so that they don’t end up in any sort of danger.

Ride Share Safety Tips

    When a person is hiring a Lyft, Uber, or any other sort of ride sharing driver, they should try following these tips to help keep themselves safe.

  • Alert the driver to being tracked. People are more likely to commit crimes when they think they can get away with it. Let a driver know that the ride is being tracked. This can be done by calling someone while in the car and saying something like: “I’m in my Uber and on my way. I’ll be there in 15 minutes and you can track the ride on the app.” If a person doesn’t want to call someone at an odd hour, they can always leave a voice memo to themselves but pretend it’s a call.
  • Be a good passenger. This means a person should always wear their seatbelt, avoid distracting the driver, and never ask the driver to do anything dangerous.
  • Be courteous to others. When riding with other passengers, be polite and kind to them as well as to the driver.
  • Check driver’s ratings. Driver’s with bad ratings typically have those ratings for a reason and should be avoided.
  • Choose seats carefully. Try to avoid sitting in the front when possible. Sitting in the back can put space between the rider and the driver and offers two doors to exit from rather than just one. A person should try to pick a seat that allows them to see the road, to make sure the driver is going the right way. A good driver won’t mind where a passenger sits, so beware of drivers who insist on someone sitting in a certain spot.
  • Don’t get personal. There is no reason to give personal information, such as a last name, phone number, or social media information, to a driver. There is also never a need to pay a driver in person. That is always handled through the app. Lastly, if a person is getting a ride home, they should have the driver drop them off somewhere safe and close to their own house, but not at the address itself to avoid giving away a home address.
  • Make sure the driver drives safely. Every driver should follow the rules of the road, especially drivers who are doing so professionally.
  • Report sketchy incidents. If anything happens that raises some alarms, report it on the app once safe. This can help prevent something bad from happening to someone else.
  • Ride with others. Everyone knows that there is strength in numbers, and the same is true for getting a ride. Try to ride with other people whenever possible.
  • Share trip information. Both Uber and Lyft allow users to share their trip with trusted contacts. This way, friends and family members will receive live updates on where the passenger’s phone is to know if the car is going the right way.
  • Trust yourself. Even if we may not know why, we often are pretty good at picking up on bad situations. If a person’s gut is telling them something is off, they should listen to it. A person should always prioritize their safety over their passenger rating.
  • Verify the vehicle. A person should always make sure that the vehicle that showed up is the one listed on their phone. Not just the make and model but also the license plate as well. Also make sure that the driver matches their photo on the app.
  • Wait in safety. When waiting for a ride, be sure to wait in a safe area that is well-lit. For instance, request the ride from inside a well-lit and populated building and only go out once the driver has arrived.
  • Watch for traffic. Always check for traffic before entering or exiting a vehicle. No one wants to get hit by a car.
  • What’s my name? Never get straight into a car. Instead, a person should approach the driver and ask them what their name is. The official driver will know the name of the person they are there to pick up and the person’s destination as well.

Stay Safe

Ride sharing apps and companies like Lyft and Uber are great ways for people to get around. This is especially important around the holiday season as people are busy going to parties and having fun. With services like this, they are able to drink as much as they want and still secure a safe ride home.

While most ride sharing drivers are safe people, there are some out there that aren’t so great. These drivers should be avoided when possible and a person should always follow the tips listed above to keep themselves safe whenever they need a ride.

Are New Year’s Eve Fireworks Legal in California?

Are New Year’s Eve Fireworks Legal in California?

Are New Year’s Eve Fireworks Legal in California?

The end of the year is rapidly approaching and everyone is getting ready. One of the big, spectacular ways that people celebrate the end of the year and the arrival of the next one is with fireworks displays. With today’s technology, a person can watch displays from all over the world.

For some people, seeing fireworks displays on television is good enough. However, there are people out there who would rather set off fireworks on their own. Unfortunately doing that sort of thing here in California is usually illegal for everyday people. In addition, there are other forms of celebration that can get a person into trouble.

Fireworks and New Year’s Eve

Here in California, there are very strict laws regarding fireworks. Fireworks are divided into two categories: dangerous, and safe and sane. Dangerous fireworks can only be purchased and set off by licensed professionals for specific shows. Safe and sane fireworks can be purchased by regular people and set off with care. However, safe and sane fireworks can only be sold in the state between June 28th and July 6th. This makes it a bit hard for someone who wants to get fireworks for New Year’s Eve celebrations.

On top of that, fireworks are usually forbidden in most areas. State law prohibits fireworks from being set off in areas where they are likely to hurt someone, or within 100 feet of a gas station. In addition, most counties add further restrictions about what kind of fireworks can be set off in what areas. For instance, many counties, such as LA County, prohibit fireworks from being set off in unincorporated areas. This is largely due to the high fire risk that fireworks present.

Most violations for fireworks result in misdemeanor charges for the person. This means that they face:

  • Up to 1 year in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.

However, in some instances, a person will face felony charges which come with:

  • Up to 3 years in state prison.
  • A max fine of $50,000.

Firing into the Sky

Another type of celebration that is definitely illegal is celebratory gunfire. California Penal Code (PC) 246.3 makes it a crime to negligently fire a firearm. This means that a person cannot willfully fire a gun in a grossly negligent manner that could result in someone’s injury or death. A perfect example of this is firing a gun into the air in celebration.

The laws of physics state that whatever goes up, must come down, and this holds true for bullets. Bullets fired into the air can come back down with deadly force. If they were to hit someone, they could severely hurt or kill someone.

This law is a wobbler offense here in California, which means it can either be charged as a misdemeanor or a felony. How it is charged depends on the facts of the case and the person’s criminal record. As a misdemeanor, a person faces:

  • Up to 1 year in jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • Summary probation.

As a felony, a person faces:

  • 16 months, 2 years, or 3 years in county jail.
  • A max fine of $10,000.
  • Formal probation.

Have a Safe and Fun New Year’s Eve

Celebrating New Year’s Eve is supposed to be fun. No one wants the fun to be ruined because someone got hurt or got arrested. That is exactly what can happen if someone sets off a firework or fires a gun into the sky. Something can very easily go wrong and someone can wind up getting severely hurt.

This is why the state has enacted laws against this kind of behavior. California doesn’t want just anyone setting off fireworks that could hurt someone or start a wildfire. The state also doesn’t want anyone recklessly firing a gun off whenever they want. If a person is caught doing either of these things, even in celebration of the new year, they will face legal consequences.

If a person thinks someone has fired a gun, or even fireworks, near them on New Year’s Eve, they should report the incident to local law enforcement. After all, it is better to be safe rather than sorry.

When it comes to celebrating the end of the year with things like fireworks, it is best to leave things to the professionals. People should go to a local show or watch one of the many worldwide celebrations on TV or the internet.

Don’t Get a DUI on New Year’s Eve

Don’t Get a DUI on New Year’s Eve

Don’t Get a DUI on New Year’s Eve

As this year draws to a close, pretty much everyone is planning out how they are going to celebrate. Parties will be happening all over the world and deciding which party to go to can be a daunting task. Luckily, the end results are pretty fun, provided a person doesn’t make any bad decisions.

As an adult, most parties that people go to have alcohol at them. This isn’t usually a problem, as long as everyone drinks responsibly. A person should know their limits with alcohol and they should have a safe ride home.

No one should ever drive themselves after consuming alcohol. Being drunk while driving is a great way to cause an accident. On top of that, it is a surefire way to get a ticket and even get arrested. So while enjoying the New Year’s Eve celebrations, people need to be responsible or they will face some harsh consequences.

California DUI Laws

Here in the state of California, just like everywhere else in the country, it is illegal for a person to drive drunk. Under Vehicle Code (VC) 23152a, driving under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol is illegal. A person is driving under the influence any time they consume enough alcohol that their abilities are impaired enough that they can no longer operate the vehicle with the care and caution of a sober person.

VC 23152b makes it illegal for a person to drive a vehicle if their blood alcohol concentration (BAC) is above 0.08%.

VC 23153 makes it a crime for a person to drive under the influence and hurt someone. Basically, if someone ever commits DUI and seriously injures someone in the process, they will be charged with this crime.

DUI Checkpoints and Holidays

Something else to consider when planning holiday parties are DUI checkpoints. Whenever holidays roll around that tend to involve a lot of drinking, such as New Year’s Eve, law enforcement agencies tend to setup DUI checkpoints in heavily trafficked areas. These checkpoints are setup in the hopes to catch drunk drivers before they are able to cause an accident and hurt/kill someone.

DUI checkpoint locations will always be posted in advanced to give people the ability to avoid them if they choose to. If a person comes across a checkpoint, they will likely have to wait in line until an officer is available to talk to them. The officer will ask a few simple questions and if everything checks out, they will allow the driver to continue on their way.

However, if the officer suspects that the driver has been drinking, then they will ask the car to pull off to the side. From there, another officer will conduct a field sobriety test to confirm whether or not the driver has been drinking. If the driver is confirmed to have been drinking, he or she will be ticketed, and either have to get a ride home or be taken into custody.

Penalties for DUI

There are a lot of specific incidents when it comes to DUI. The consequences of DUI depend on which particular incident occurred. For a first time offense, a person faces misdemeanor charges that come with:

  • Up to 6 months in county jail.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • A 4 month driver’s license suspension.
  • Up to 9 months of DUI school.

The consequences for basic DUI increase with each offense.

If a person commits DUI and hurts someone, they will typically face misdemeanor charges that come with:

  • Up to 1 year in county jail.
  • A Max fine of $5,000.
  • A 1 year driver’s license suspension.
  • Up to 30 months of DUI school.
  • Paying restitutions to the victim.

If a person commits too many DUI’s within a set time period, or they kill someone because of DUI, they will automatically face felony charges. Felony DUI charges come with:

  • 16 months, 2 years, or 3 years in state prison.
  • A max fine of $1,000.
  • A 5 year driver’s license suspension.
  • Up to 30 months of DUI school.
  • These charges may seem light, but if a death was involved, they are often charged with vehicular manslaughter charges, which carry harsher consequences.

    End the Year on a High Note

    As the end of the year draws closer, everyone is planning out how to celebrate it. No matter what a person decides with the celebrations, if a person plans on drinking on New Year’s Eve, they need to do so responsibly. This means knowing their limits and having a plan to get home that doesn’t involve driving themselves.

    In today’s modern world, getting a safe ride home is a piece of cake thanks to apps like Uber and Lyft. Plus, there are always the traditional methods such as hiring a taxi or just designating a friend as a sober driver.

    No matter what you end up doing this New Year’s Eve, be sure to send 2019 off on a high note, which means not getting a ticket for DUI or causing an accident.

    What Are Co-Signers and What Do They Do?

    What Are Co-Signers and What Do They Do?

    What Are Co-Signers and What Do They Do?

    You can’t be expected to know everything about a subject or service that you have never used before. Nowhere is this fact truer than when it comes to bail. Most people have never dealt with bail before, and so they have lots of questions about the process. That is why Bail Bonds in Tulare is here to help.

    One topic that has been known to cause confusion amongst clients, is co-signers. What are they, and who can be one? It is actually a really simple term. A co-signer is anyone who is willing to sign the bail bond to get their friend or family member out of jail. They are called co-signers when there is more than one person willing to sign.

    Anyone who wants to help rescue their loved one from jail can become a co-signer. However, it is recommended to find people who have good credit or meet other requirements, as this can help make paying for the bail easier for everyone. For instance, at Bail Bonds in Tulare we offer a 20% discount on the price of the bail bond if one of the co-signers meets just one of the following:

    • Is a member of a union.
    • Is a member of the military.
    • Is a member of AARP.
    • Is a homeowner.
    • Has a private attorney.

    By becoming a co-signer for a bail bond, a person is taking partial responsibility of the bail bond. This means it is up to them to make sure payments are made on time. They are also responsible for making sure their loved one goes to all of his or her court dates. Lastly, they will be responsible for making sure their loved one stays out of trouble. After all, they don’t want him or her to get arrested again.

    When you have questions about any aspect of the bail process, you can always count on Bail Bonds in Tulare. Our bail agents are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. They will always be ready to answer your questions.

    Still have questions about bail? Talk to an agent for free by calling 559-784-8660 or clicking Chat With Us now.

    How Much Do You Have to Pay?

    How Much Do You Have to Pay?

    How Much Do You Have to Pay?

    When it comes to bail bonds, figuring out prices before someone has been arrested can be tricky. This is due to the fact that bail amounts vary depending on the crime a person was arrested for, their criminal record, and the kind of mood the judge was in in that day. Without that information, we can only guess how expensive the bail will be.

    However, here at Bail Bonds in Visalia, we know that our clients will only have to pay 10% of the full bail price. This is due to the fact that our bail bonds cost 10% of the bail they are for. On top of that, we provide payment plans for all of our clients and additional discounts for clients who qualify.

    When it comes to our payment plans, they break up the cost of the bail bond and spread it out over several months. This makes paying for the bond so much easier. Since we do not charge interest on our payment plans, there is nothing to worry about. Our payment plans give you the time to save up for payments without charging you extra for the benefit.

    At Bail Bonds in Visalia, we offer a 20% discount off the price of the bail bond if one of the co-signers meets one of the following requirements:

    • Is a member of the military.
    • Is a member of AARP.
    • Is a member of a union.
    • Is a homeowner.
    • Has a private attorney.

    So long as one of those requirements is met by just one of the co-signers for the bail bond, then you qualify for the discount. This means that instead of paying 10% of the full bail price, you only have to pay 8%.

    Figuring out the price of a bail bond before an arrest can be tricky, but finding an affordable way to pay for it is a piece of cake. Here at Bail Bonds in Visalia, we provide all of our clients with affordable payment plans with 0% interest. On top of that, we offer a 20% discount for qualified clients.

    Do you want to post bail at an affordable price? If so, call 559-784-8660 or click Chat With Us now.

    Beware of Porch Pirates and Package Theft

    Beware of Porch Pirates and Package Theft

    Beware of Porch Pirates and Package Theft

    One of the nicest benefits of living in today’s modern world is that pretty much anything can be ordered online and delivered to a person’s home. This allows people to buy things they want or need without ever having to leave the house. This ability is very useful. However, as with all good things, there are those people out there that have to ruin it for everybody.

    There are always people looking to make a quick and easy buck, and that is exactly what porch pirates are. They take advantage of people’s orders being left out in the open and claim them for themselves. This problem only becomes more prominent as the holiday season draws nearer and people begin ordering more things online.

    What Are Porch Pirates?

    Porch pirate is a name for anyone who steals a delivered package from somebody’s front porch or yard. More often than not, these kind of thefts are crimes of opportunity. The person just happened to be walking, or even driving, by and they saw the package, or letter then decide in a moment to take it. They have no idea what could be inside, but they want it for themselves.

    Of course, there are some people who have turned this kind of behavior into their day job. They will spend their days scouring through neighborhoods looking for unattended packages that are just waiting to be taken. They steal the packages and either keep the contents for themselves or sell them to someone else to make a profit.

    Either way, one can easily see why this crime can be so distressing and upsetting for the victim, especially around Christmas time when the package could have been a gift for someone else.

    Tips to Avoid Porch Pirates

    Everyone wants to avoid falling victim to a porch pirate, especially during the holiday season. Luckily, there are a few different ways to reduce the chances of having a package stolen.

    • Amazon now has a service that allows for delivery inside a home. A person just unlocks their front door with an app on their phone so the delivery person can put the package in a safe place. They also have a similar thing for delivering inside a person’s car.
    • Have a trusted friend, neighbor, or family member who is home during the day get the package off the porch while at work.
    • Have packages delivered to work. If your workplace allows this, your packages will be delivered and watched over until you can pick it up.
    • Make sure someone will be home to answer the door and receive the package. By getting it off the porch, it is far less likely to be stolen.
    • Require a signature for the delivery. This ensures that the package isn’t left alone.
    • Set up a security camera aimed at the porch to help deter thefts in the first place. If a theft does occur, their will at least be video evidence of the culprit and their illegal act.
    • Some delivery companies, such as UPS, allow for customers to leave delivery instructions, such as hiding the package in a shed, instead of leaving it on a front porch.
    • The USPS provides a service called USPS Package Intercept that allows customers to change delivery destinations before the package has been sent out for final delivery.
    • UPS has a service called UPS My Choice that alerts a customer to a delivery the day before and allows them to change the time or location of the delivery for a small fee.
    • UPS, FedEx, and Amazon offer services where packages can be delivered to secure locations such as an office, warehouse, or locker. This way the package is safe until the customer comes to pick it up.

    Penalties for Mail Theft

    Stealing another person’s mail is illegal under both federal and state law. United States Code (USC) 1708 defines how mail can be stolen, and then lists how states should punish offenders of this crime. In a very long and descriptive way, the law basically states that anyone who knowingly takes someone else’s mail without permission to do so is guilty of mail theft. This law also defines what counts as mail, and includes the following items:

    • Letters.
    • Postcards.
    • Packages.
    • Mail bags.

    Here in California, mail theft is a misdemeanor offense under Penal Code (PC) 530.5e. This law makes it so that people who steal mail, such as porch pirates, face the following:

    • Up to 1 year in jail.
    • A max fine of $1,000.

    This law also makes it so that people can be charged with other laws on top of this one. This means that a person accused of breaking this law could actually face harsher consequences as well.

    Don’t Get Pirated This Holiday Season

    The holiday season is all about giving, but porch pirates out there are only concerned with taking. Don’t fall victim to them. Follow the tips above to help prevent a porch pirate from walking off with a loved one’s Christmas gift this holiday season.

    Have you ever been victimized by a porch pirate? Do you have any tips to avoid porch pirates that aren’t listed above? What about California’s take on mail theft? Are the consequences harsh enough, or does there need to be more of a deterrent against porch piracy? Let us know what you think in the comments down below.

    Can Minors Have Alcohol in California?

    Can Minors Have Alcohol in California?

    Can Minors Have Alcohol in California?

    There are certain laws that everyone knows about, such as don’t drive over the speed limit, don’t steal things from other people, and anyone under 21 is not allowed to drink alcohol. However, while these laws are well known, a lot of people tend to ignore them, which is never a good idea.

    Ignoring a law is a good way to get into trouble. One slip up could cause a person to be arrested or forced to pay a fine. This is especially true when it comes to laws surrounding minors and alcohol. Breaking a law is bad enough as an adult, abut as a minor it can lead to problems down the line.

    Minors and Alcohol Laws in California

    Here in the state of California, it is illegal for minors to consume alcohol under Business and Professions Code (BPC) 25658. Under this law, it is illegal to do the following:

    • Sell alcohol to a minor, anyone under the age of 21.
    • Buying alcohol as a minor is illegal.
    • It is a misdemeanor to give alcohol to a minor who then gets into a car accident for driving while drunk.
    • It is a misdemeanor to allow a minor to consume alcohol on business property regardless if the person knew the minor was under 21 or not.

    BPC 25658 is just one of several state laws that restrict the usage of alcohol amongst minors. For instance, BPC 25662 makes it illegal for a minor to even be in possession of alcohol.

    Under these two laws, a minor can never posses or consume alcohol, not even if their parent or legal guardian allows them to have the alcohol. While that particular instance may be okay in some states, it is illegal here in California. Minors can never have alcohol. This is further confirmed by DUI laws related to minors.

    When it comes to driving while intoxicated, adults have to worry about having a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 0.08%. Minors get into trouble if they have a BAC over 0.01%.

    Penalties of Breaking These Laws

    In most instances of minors with alcohol, both the minor and the adult that provided them with the alcohol will face consequences. The exact consequences that a person will face are dependent on which law was broken. In most instances, the person will face misdemeanor charges.

    When a minor is caught with alcohol in their possession, under BPC 25662, they face misdemeanor charges. This includes:

    • A $250 fine for first time offenses. A $500 fine for subsequent offenses.
    • 24 -32 hours of community service, either at an alcohol/drug treatment center or a county coroner’s office.
    • Participation in a youth drunk driver program.
    • 1 year driver’s license suspension or a 1 year delay in acquiring a driver’s license.

    Breaking BPC 25658, whether as a minor consuming alcohol or as an adult providing alcohol to a minor, is a misdemeanor offense. Someone accused of this crime faces:

    • Up to 6 months in county jail.
    • A max fine of $1,000.

    If a minor is caught driving while under the influence of alcohol with a BAC of 0.01%, they will face a 1 year suspension of their driver’s license under Vehicle Code (VC) 23136. This is the state’s zero tolerance law for underage drinking and driving.

    If a minor is caught driving with a BAC of 0.05% or greater, they will face consequences under VC 23140. This is the states underage DUI law. It comes with the following, infraction level consequences:

    • No jail time.
    • 1 year driver’s license suspension.
    • 3 months of mandatory alcohol education program.

    If a minor has a BAC of 0.08% or higher, than they can be charged with regular DUI, which carries harsher consequences.

    Don’t Give Minors Alcohol

    Alcohol can be enjoyable, when consumed responsibly. Minors under the age of 21 are often not mature enough to handle alcohol. This can lead to them over consuming, and then putting themselves into dangerous or life-threatening situations, which is why they are prohibited from drinking. This is also why it is such a big deal for adults to give alcohol to minors.

    With the holiday season starting up, there will be a lot more parties and a lot more alcohol around. If anyone has family visiting from other states where minors are allowed to consume alcohol when their parent or legal guardian permits it, inform them that California sees things differently.

    What do you think of California’s take on minors and alcohol? Is the state taking the right precautions or does it need to loosen up a bit? Let us know what you think in the comments down below.